shingekinowhyiseveryonedying:

Ah, you’re watching Attack on Titan? I love that anime. The way they all just [clenches fist] die.

chekhovandowl:

tastefullyoffensive:

Illustrated Dad Jokes by @swatercolourPreviously: Funny and Cute Illustrations by Jaco Haasbroek

rblogging for reference.
chekhovandowl:

tastefullyoffensive:

Illustrated Dad Jokes by @swatercolourPreviously: Funny and Cute Illustrations by Jaco Haasbroek

rblogging for reference.
chekhovandowl:

tastefullyoffensive:

Illustrated Dad Jokes by @swatercolourPreviously: Funny and Cute Illustrations by Jaco Haasbroek

rblogging for reference.

chekhovandowl:

tastefullyoffensive:

Illustrated Dad Jokes by @swatercolour

Previously: Funny and Cute Illustrations by Jaco Haasbroek

rblogging for reference.

  • <b> Status:</b> Rain! :)<p><b>Older person on Facebook:</b> Us too, so badly needed as well. Tell your mom I said hi. How is the family? Tell everyone hi from us. We miss you all so much. Wish we could be there. You're a beautiful young woman.<p>

asiansnotstudying:

When I met my fiance’s African-American stepfather, things did not start well. Stumbling for some way to start a conversation with a man whose life was unlike mine in almost every respect, I asked “So, what do you do for a living?”.

He looked down at his shoes and said quietly “Well, I’m unemployed”.

At the time I cringed inwardly and recognized that I had committed a terrible social gaffe which seemed to scream “Hey prospective in-law, since I am probably going to be a member of your family real soon, I thought I would let you know up front that I am a completely insensitive jackass”. But I felt even worse years later when I came to appreciate the racial dimension of how I had humiliated my stepfather-in-law to be.

For that painful but necessary bit of knowledge I owe a white friend who throughout her childhood attended Chicago schools in a majority Black district. She passed along a marvelous book that helped her make sense of her own inter-racial experiences. It was Thomas Kochman’s Black and White Styles in Conflict, and it had a lasting effect on me. One of the many things I learned from this anthropological treasure trove of a book is how race affects the personal questions we feel entitled to ask and the answers we receive in response.

My question to my wife-to-be’s stepfather was at the level of content a simple conversation starter (albeit a completely failed one). But at the level of process, it was an expression of power. Kochman’s book sensitized me to middle class whites’ tendency to ask personal questions without first considering whether they have a right to know the personal details of someone else’s life. When we ask someone what they do for a living for example, we are also asking for at least partial information on their income, their status in the class hierarchy and their perceived importance in the world. Unbidden, that question can be quite an invasion. The presumption that one is entitled to such information is rarely made explicit, but that doesn’t prevent it from forcing other people to make a painful choice: Disclose something they want to keep secret or flatly refuse to answer (which oddly enough usually makes them, rather than the questioner, look rude).

Kochman’s book taught me a new word, which describes an indirect conversational technique he studied in urban Black communities: “signifying”. He gives the example (as I recall it, 25 years on) of a marriage-minded black woman who is dating a man who pays for everything on their very nice dates. She wonders if he has a good job. But instead of grilling him with “So what do you do for a living?”, she signifies “Whatever oil well you own, I hope it keeps pumping!”.

Her signifying in this way is a sensitive, respectful method to raise the issue she wants to know about because unlike my entitled direct question it keeps the control under the person whose personal information is of interest. Her comment could be reasonably responded to by her date as a funny joke, a bit of flirtation, or a wish for good luck. But of course it also shows that if the man freely chooses to reveal something like “Things look good for me financially: I’m a certified public accountant at a big, stable firm”, he can do so and know she will be interested.

Since reading Kochman’s book, I have never again directly asked anyone what they do for a living. Instead my line is “So how do you spend your time?”. Some people (particularly middle class white people) choose to answer that question in the bog standard way by describing their job. But other people choose to tell me about the compelling novel they are reading, what they enjoy about being a parent, the medical treatment they are getting for their bad back, whatever. Any of those answers flow just as smoothly from the signification in a way they wouldn’t from a direct question about their vocation.

From the perspective of ameliorating all the racial pain in the world, this change in my behavior is a grain of sand in the Sahara. But I pass this experience along nonetheless, for two reasons. First, very generally, if any of us human beings can easily engage in small kindnesses, we should. Second, specific to race, if those of us who have more power can learn to refrain from using it to harm people in any way – major or minor — we should do that too.

cviperfan:
excuseyoukyofu:

"All anime is the same"
Let me explain you a thing

a major catastrophe causes the brown-haired protagonist to join an organization with matching uniforms and characters of varying personalities, heights and sexual orientations that exists for a seemingly straightforward purpose while also struggling with a hidden aspect of their identity that can be helpful but also makes things complicated in unexpected ways
cviperfan:
excuseyoukyofu:

"All anime is the same"
Let me explain you a thing

a major catastrophe causes the brown-haired protagonist to join an organization with matching uniforms and characters of varying personalities, heights and sexual orientations that exists for a seemingly straightforward purpose while also struggling with a hidden aspect of their identity that can be helpful but also makes things complicated in unexpected ways

cviperfan:

excuseyoukyofu:

"All anime is the same"

Let me explain you a thing

a major catastrophe causes the brown-haired protagonist to join an organization with matching uniforms and characters of varying personalities, heights and sexual orientations that exists for a seemingly straightforward purpose while also struggling with a hidden aspect of their identity that can be helpful but also makes things complicated in unexpected ways

croctus:

THE ASEXUAL AGENDA: educate as many people as possible on asexuality so nobody has to feel lost and broken and bad about who they are ever again

"things to remember:

i. you are an infinite being. there is a collection
in you and sometimes we call it planets and moons
and sometimes protons and electrons - you are
forever carrying universes in your body.

ii. knives stud your teeth and there are blades
sheathed in your sleeves. use them if you need to;
use them before you burn.

iii. icarus fell, yes, but he flew first. his skin still
tasted like sun and freedom when the waves
embraced him.

iv. numbers do not, cannot, and will not ever
define you.

v. athena may have been the goddess of wisdom,
but she was also the goddess of battle strategy.
you have fight built into your bones.
do not give up.

vi. do not give up."
— (d.s)
"While it is true that gender and sex are different things, and that gender is indeed a social construct, sex isn’t the Ultimate Biological Reality that transphobes make it out to be. There’s nothing intrinsically male about XY chromosomes, testosterone, body hair, muscle mass or penises. If an alien civilization found earth, they wouldn’t look at a person with a penis and say “Oh, that must be a male, sex based on genitalia is the One Universal Constant.” Sex, like gender, is indeed socially constructed and can be changed.

If sex isn’t the All Mighty Binary Universal Constant that some people think it is, why do they place so much importance on it? The easy answer is that it gives them an excuse to misgender and exclude trans people, and specifically trans women. They can pretend they’re just standing up for science, but they’re really just saying that trans women aren’t fully women and that trans men aren’t fully men. People need to start learning about what sex really is and what social constructs really are. People need to stop misusing biology and spreading ignorance and misunderstanding. People need to stop looking for excuses for their anti-trans bigotry. All of this needs to stop and it needs to stop now."
mintyburps:
I’m trying to speed up the time it takes for me to finish digitally, aka holding back on all those overlays :’D.

mintyburps:

I’m trying to speed up the time it takes for me to finish digitally, aka holding back on all those overlays :’D.